Los Angeles Black Worker Center In the News

Radio Interview: Beautiful Struggle

With K. King, M. Datcher, P. Wilson, K. Perry, A. Redmond, and I. Phillips, KPFK Radio 90.7, September 3rd, 2013

Lola Smallwood-Cuevas and Andre Hollins join the Beautiful Struggle collective to discuss the state of the Black worker in Los Angeles and the opportunity in public construction to turn the tide on the Black Jobs Crisis.

Listen to the full show archived here at www.kpfk.org

Radio Interview: Flip The Script

With R. Matsuda, S. Waheed, KPFK Radio 90.7, September 2nd, 2013

Lola Smallwood-Cuevas, Brigitte Barrow, and Richard Stevenson join Riku and Saba to share worker stories and to highlight the LA Workers Congress, where workers, labor leaders, and community members will strategize on how to reverse the Black Jobs Crisis.

Listen to the full show archived here at www.kpfk.org

Black workers embody the new low-wage economy

By E. Tammy Kim, Aljazeera America September 12th, 2013

Amid recent Walmart and fast-food strikes, a chance arises to rethink African-American labor

Read the full article here.

Black Worker Center holds Crenshaw LAX line jobs fair

By Olu Alemoru, Los Angeles Wave September 11th, 2013

Under its theme “Black Workers Rising,” the grassroots advocacy organization the Los Angeles Black Worker Center (BWC) held a ready-to-work resource fair and rally in Leimert Park last Saturday to galvanize the local community for construction opportunities ahead of the $1.73 billion Crenshaw LAX Light Rail line.

Read the full article here.

Workers hoping to build Crenshaw Line rally in Leimert Park

By Kurt Streeter, Los Angeles Times, September 7th, 2013

Supervisor Ridley-Thomas tells the Ready to Work Rally that Metro must hire from the depressed area along the line. For Andre Hollins, who is black, finding work has been difficult.

Read the full article here.

Black workers to meet, rally

By OW Staff Writer, Our Weekly, August 29th, 2013

Resource and health fair set.

Read the full article here.

Construction trades turn to BLING to recruit more Black workers

By Cynthia Griffin, Our Weekly, November 29, 2012

The Los Angeles Black Worker Center and its union partners have created a three-month program designed to get more African Americans into the construction trades and keep them there.

Read the full article here.

The Los Angeles Black Worker Center Unites Community Workers at Town Hall Meeting
The Roving Eye, California Crusader News, May 3, 2012

More than 200 Black construction workers and community residents joined civic and labor leaders on Saturday at a town hall meeting to discuss a new era in employment for African Americans two decades after the civil unrest.

Download the issue here.

Disadvantaged workers win in new MTA agreement
By Cynthia Griffin, Our Weekly, February 2, 2012

Our Weekly spotlights the Black Worker Center’s role in including stronger anti-discrimination provisions in the MTA’s historic PLA.

Read the full article here.

MTA Oks project labor agreement: Next step is enforcement, says advocate
By Cynthia Griffin, Our Weekly, September 29, 2011

MTA has given staff the green light to begin negotiating a project labor agreement (PLA) construction careers policy with the Los Angeles and Orange County Construction Trade Council. Lola Smallwood Cuevas, coordinator for the Los Angeles Black Worker Center, says the PLA legislation offers the MTA opportunity “to usher in a new era to enforce anti-discrimination laws ensuring that Black workers, who are among the hardest hit (in terms of unemployment) have equal job opportunities.”

Read the full article here.

MTA looks at Project Labor Agreement
By Cynthia Griffin, Our Weekly, September 22, 2011.

On September 22, the MTA will vote to authorize negotiations of a Project Labor Agreement/Construction Careers policy. The five-year policy would reemploy existing construction workers in long-term careers as well as target the hiring of skilled workers residing in communities with the highest unemployment rates.

Read the full article here.

Psychology of Black unemployment
By Cynthia Griffin, Our Weekly, September 15, 2011

In this article, journalist Cynthia Griffin investigates some of the many psychological and social effects caused by the increasing unemployment rate amongst the Black community. A strong connection is made between unemployment rate’s toll onthe community and a solution- to understand “the future world of work as well as how to meaningfully connect youth and adults”.

Read the full article here.

Black Worker Center educates workers about job losses
By Cynthia Griffin, Our Weekly, March 24, 2011

Two days before the Los Angeles Black Worker Center’s rally for Black worker rights, Our Weekly discusses the impact on Black workers of Congressional votes to reduce critical job-creating ARRA funds and attacks on public sector unions. Director Lola Smallwood-Cuevas calls these efforts an“attack on the final leg of the three-legged Black worker job stool that once consisted of manufacturing in the 1970s and human services from the 1970s on.”

Read the full article here.

New Facility Highlights Black Worker Center’s Mission
By Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times, September 26, 2010

The LA Times profile of the Los Angeles Black Worker Center, which emphasizes our “day of service and community.” Dozens of BWC sheet metal workers, electricians, painters and other construction workers joined County Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas to support the renovation of our building, the Paul Robeson Center.

Read the full article here.

Taking up the cause: Center focuses on needs of Black workers
By Cynthia Griffin, Our Weekly, March 25, 2010

Our Weekly

This article discusses some of the main goals and expectations held by the Black Worker Center. Journalist Cynthia Griffin touches on points such as the organization’s collaborations between unions, researchers and other groups to insure access to quality jobs. Griffin also creates discussion over one of the organization’s main goals- “to inform employers, policy makers, and labor about unique barriers African American face”.

Read the full article here.

LA BWC develops organized power and grassroots leaders who strengthen all of Los Angeles by advancing economic and racial justice for Black workers and the families that rely on them.